Tag Archives: comedy

Geek Out: Library Wars Anime

At first glance this anime seems… weird. For some reason people are killing people for the sake of protecting books. But in reality, it is so much more than that. This anime explores censorship and human reactions to potentially life changing events.

More than those great overall themes, the anime can be just as enjoyable if you prefer to watch it for the characters. Kasahara (the main female character), mentions near the end of the series that although she couldn’t remember the main plot of one of the books that she loved she could recall everything about the characters she had read about. Their lives created a side story which she enjoyed even more than the main one. I believe the point she made is very true about Library Wars. The overall plot is great by the time you get a few episodes in and have gotten over the fact that they are fighting and dying for the sake of books. However, it was the side story of the characters and how their relationships evolve over the course of the anime that made the story truly rich. Because of the characters you start to root for the Library corps. Because of the characters you realize in a low-key way how war effects soldiers and how even the enemy is human.

If you are looking for an accurate description of the atrocities of war this anime will not fit what you are looking for. However, if you love books, art, and freedom of speech, or if you just want an enjoyable anime with an interesting plot and characters and don’t mind a bit of a slow start, Library Wars may be for you.

myanimelist synopsis

Library Wars episodes english subbed

Library Wars Movie english subbed (watch after the series)

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Why are Things Funny?

What is and isn’t funny changes from person to person. Everyone’s individual experiences and cultures are completely different and what everyone thinks is funny differs due to that. However, there are several tricks and topics that are almost universally bound to get a giggle if they are presented right.

My favourite trick for comedy is the rule of three. When I was in Drama productions this technique was used a minimum of once a play. What it is is when the same thing happens three times in the play but the third time is slightly different from the previous times. For example, a character (I will call him Bob) is nervous to enter the room where his angry girlfriend is furiously going over her inner monologue out loud. Every time he timidly begins to enter the room she shouts in frustration that if she were to see him she would punch his face in or something equally as undesirable. Then when he retreats she remembers something good about him and he begins to enter the room with new hope only for it to be dashed again. The third time he pokes his head in she keeps saying good things about him so he comes all the way into the room. Meanwhile out of frustration and confusion, his girlfriend grabs something and hurls straight into Bob before realizing he is there… It is difficult to grasp without seeing it but next time you go to a play or see a movie, keep track events that seem to be repeating with slight variations they usually are funniest the third time the event happens.

Universal topics for Comedy need to be relatable to most people. This is why romance is such a popular genre throughout the world, it is relatable. Romance and other genres are not completely free from cultural differences. Dating and marriage practices are very culturally specific. However, domestic affairs, love triangles, and many other situations from the genre appear in comedies all over the world, Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew, Kalidasa’s Malavika and Agnimitra, Plautus’ Casina, multiple Japanese anime and American cartoons. They all have examples of romance and the problems it can cause being used as comedic devices. Aside from romance, most people have experience with work and school. Also, physical comedy is funny for all ages but the type of physical humour that is funny could be different depending on the country and culture.

Lastly Irony is an absolute staple for any joke or comedic scene. For some strange reason it is funny when the exact opposite of what we believe is going to happen happens. Shakespeare loved to use Irony in his plays and writers still use this device in modern works. It hasn’t stopped being used after all these years because it works. Irony brings surprise and almost a sense of novelty to a story. It can refresh a stale plot and facilitates laughter which releases dopamine that will make the story seem more enjoyable. Overall, Irony is a powerful tool that, when used correctly, can vastly improve any comedy.